Book Wishlist.

When I return to the UK for my next visit I intend to bring back some of the unread books I have in my collection, until then I have several books in my mentally noted wishlist that I would much like to purchase if possible. I have attempted to get into the whole ebook way of doing things, but something about physically grasping a paperback book is much more satisfying: maybe it has something to do with the page’s scent, it’s nostalgic of my childhood and adolescence.

The Things You Can Only See When You Calm Down – by Haemin Sunim. This is an informative guide written by a Buddhist monk who was born in Korea and educated in the United States. He uses colourful illustrations as a calming technique whilst giving details on how to overcome negative events and aspects that you may have experienced in life. Coping with modern day life is also expressed. Usually I’m not inclined to reach for a so called self help text, though this one in particular seems to have had a positive impact on many readers from Korea and now Europe and America. Some elements of the book includes uplifting messages which he gave as advice to people on social media after they reached out to him. If you are looking for a light read that serves as merely a way of promoting positive mental health, look no further as this is your ideal read. 

Aeneid Book VI – by Seamus Heaney. If you are around my age and educated in the UK, you will most likely associate the poems of Seamus Heaney with your GCSE English Literature anthology. In a sense this book is Heaney’s interpretation of the impact that Virgil’s poem, which was composed sometime between 29 and 19BC, had had on his writings. In order to understand the works of Heaney, it is suggested that we explore his words recorded in this book to fully appreciate and analyse the meaning behind the poems he had written. In a way I feel like this literature is out of my intelligence league, but overcoming barriers to information through complex language is something we all have to learn through time and practice. 

East West Street – by Philippe Sands. In 2016 this non-fiction book won the Baillie Gifford prize for it’s amazing recount of the author’s own family history, predominantly based around post WWII, and human rights law in which as a lawyer he had involvement in correcting. Without reading it, it is difficult to establish the structure of the book as is encompasses several different aspects that link together; although what I can distinguish from the brief synopsis is that it may concern the lives of two young male ‘characters’. 

Did Anyone Else See That Coming? : unpublished letters to the Daily Telegraph. This is an annually published collection of letters that didn’t manage to get printed in to issues of the Daily Telegraph. Due to popular demand they made another batch of funny and relatable letters this year. I have never read any of the previous issues, just it simply appears to be a joyess, mood changing read which can be read steadily. 

Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus – by John Gray. This much loved novel is quite possibly the book that I have most wanted to engage in for as long as I can remember. Why do I keep forgetting to buy a copy!? (-I did come close to buying it at Seoul International Airport, Korea but it was an imported English book so somewhat expensive). I don’t think this book needs any introduction: it’s well known enough. Not only is it on my book wishlist it’s something I want to tick off from my bucket list in the new year!

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