Another Tea Haul.

Asda – Rhubarb & Custard flavoured tea.

Supermarket own brands of tea are usually limited to the basic varieties unless they have self-titled ‘finest’ or ‘luxury’ ranges. Evidently ‘Asda’ (- The name given to ‘Walmart’ stores in the UK) have produced a line of tea themed around sweet treats; one of which being inspired by Rhubarb and Custard: a classic hard boiled sweet/candy. I would say custard is more of an undertone flavour as unsurprisingly rhubarb provides a statement tanginess.

Nokchawon – Rooibos with Vanilla and Honey.

When purchasing this tea I was hesitated to try it. I’m not much of a honey fan; in my eyes it’s always been one of those ‘got to be in the right mood’ sort of ingredients. Additionally I was inquisitive for experiencing the taste of Rooibos as I have never had Rooibos tea of the regular variety prior. I can confidently confirm that it’s another tea ideal for fulfilling sugar cravings without falling into the temptation of snacking on biscuits etc. As it is quite flavoursome I use the same teabag twice or three times rather than once.

Taylor’s of Harrogate – Rose Lemonade.

Don’t be confused, I know well lemonade isn’t a form of tea. This unique blend is infact a tea that was a slightly regrettable addition to my shopping basket. By no means does it taste bad, infact it’s rather refreshing and I like the mild bitterness. The main issue being I’m not entirely sure whether the flavours compliment each other. One of my favourite drinks is lemonade and anything with a hint of rose (-taste or scent) is usually inclined to be a winner for me. Unfortunately the tea was a disappointment and it took me a while to use the entire contents of the box.

Lift – Instant Peach Tea.

Whichever the brand you can’t go wrong with peach tea. What I like in particular about ‘Lift’ instant is that it can be prepared as a hot or chilled beverage. In the UK, it’s hard to come by Lipton Ice Tea powder (which I can’t phantom because isn’t Lipton a British brand?) so ‘Lift’ is a more affordable, easily accessible alternative. For years my Parents and Grandparents have kept a jar of this on their kitchen countertops; it was a “disaster” when it was discontinued for a while. Lemon and apple flavours are also sold, however I am unsure whether the reduced sugar versions continue to be manufactured.

Twining’s – Cranberry & Blood Orange.

Clearly from both of my tea hauls it’s been established that ‘Twining’s’ well deserve their outstanding worldwide reputation. Once again this is another genius leaf and fruit extract combination. The cranberry brings the zingy whereas the blood orange fades out some of the cranberries’ harsh impact with some natural sugars plus citrus. If you head out to grab some I suggest you buy two boxes per time, because you will want to guzzle it like fresh water.

Japanese Royal Milk Tea.

I have yet to determine which specific brand of Japanese Royal Milk Tea I prefer; it’s something I always pick up when walking around a lot on a trip to Central London or Seoul. Japanese Royal Milk Tea usually has an earthy taste, thanking to the Assam and Darjeeling leaves, which is dulled down by the creaminess of the milk. If you have ever had Chinese Assam milk tea from your local Asian supermarket, it’s pretty similar. I recommend drinking it hot rather than straight from the refrigerator: Korean vending machines can provide cans of it at either cold or hot temperatures.

Nongfu Spring – Citrus Green Tea.

This is a suitable way of trying cooled green tea. As the green tea within the drink was brewed uncountable days before consumption, the green tea’s strength and colour is much richer than that of newly prepared Sencha. In this case the citrus provides an even balance among the flavours. I first came across this brand at ‘Oriental Delight’ in London’s Chinatown which mainly sells discounted Chinese, Japanese and Korean snacks.

Would like to buy me a tea or coffee? http://www.paypal.me/EmmaM95

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